sci.lang.japan FAQ / 1. Writing / 1.3. Other questions on writing / 1.3.9. What are the different styles of Japanese lettering?

1.3.9.5. Other font styles

Example of POP typeface

POP shotai

The POP shotai (ポップ書体) or "Point Of Purchase" typeface is often used for shop signs. It is meant to replicate the look of characters drawn with a felt-tip pen. Shop assistants may also take courses on how to write characters in this style.

Eiga moji

eishotai (映書体), sukuriin moji (スクリーン文字), shinema shotai (シネマ書体) or eiga moji (映画文字) is the style of writing used for movie subtitles. The letters are, or were, actually written by hand directly onto the 35 mm film by specially trained people called "title writers". The actual characters are less than one millimetre in size, and the special look of this style, and its heavy use of abbreviated kanji forms, are due to the restrictions imposed by space.


sci.lang.japan FAQ / 1. Writing / 1.3. Other questions on writing / 1.3.9. What are the different styles of Japanese lettering?

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